If I had to explain why The Smiths are the most amazing thing in the world it’s because they reach into the part of you where you feel the most weak, vulnerable and unacceptable and glorify it, make it heroic.

Russell Brand (via albioncreed)

(via moss-aurora)

dearnonacepeople:

People defend capitalism by saying that capitalism is the only system that works. Ask someone who’s homeless how capitalism is working for them or those in sweatshops or those unable to get adequate healthcare or education. Capitalism is continuing the destruction of our earth, creating economic inequality, perpetuating classism, racism, ableism, child labor, and so much more. Capitalism doesn’t work, it kills.

(via moss-aurora)

But, first, remember, remember, remember the signs. Say them to yourself when you wake in the morning and when you lie down at night, and when you wake in the middle of the night. And whatever strange things may happen to you, let nothing turn your mind from following the signs. And secondly, I give you a warning. Here on the mountain I have spoken to you clearly: I will not often do so down in Narnia. Here on the mountain, the air is clear and your mind is clear; as you drop down into Narnia, the air will thicken. Take great care that it does not confuse your mind. And the signs which you have learned here will not look at all as you expect them to look, when you meet them there. That is why it is so important to know them by heart and pay no attention to appearances. Remember the signs and believe the signs. Nothing else matters.

C.S Lewis,  The Chronicles of Narnia (via sarah-sea)

(via portlandcoffee)

When you need to stop an asteroid, you get Superman. When you need to solve a mystery, you call Batman. But when you need to end a war, you get Wonder Woman.

Gail Simone, Wonder Woman: The Circle

image

(via justiceleaguers)

(via albinwonderland)

At 19, I read a sentence that re-terraformed my head: “The level of matter in the universe has been constant since the Big Bang.”
In all the aeons we have lost nothing, we have gained nothing - not a speck, not a grain, not a breath. The universe is simply a sealed, twisting kaleidoscope that has reordered itself a trillion trillion trillion times over.
Each baby, then, is a unique collision - a cocktail, a remix - of all that has come before: made from molecules of Napoleon and stardust and comets and whale tooth; colloidal mercury and Cleopatra’s breath: and with the same darkness that is between the stars between, and inside, our own atoms.
When you know this, you suddenly see the crowded top deck of the bus, in the rain, as a miracle: this collection of people is by way of a starburst constellation. Families are bright, irregular-shaped nebulae. Finding a person you love is like galaxies colliding. We are all peculiar, unrepeatable, perambulating micro-universes - we have never been before and we will never be again. Oh God, the sheer exuberant, unlikely face of our existences. The honour of being alive. They will never be able to make you again. Don’t you dare waste a second of it thinking something better will happen when it ends. Don’t you dare

Caitlin Moran (via artvevo)

(via i-should-be-practicing-viola)